Posted in building the new world, End of the World Prophecies, grief, world changes

It’s Really Ok to Grieve

There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that we are currently traveling through the death of the world as we have known it.  I also know that death, in this case, is not an ending.  Instead, as the old world is imploding upon itself, a new world is beginning to be born.  While we may have hope in the new that is coming forth out of this dying, it is also important to grieve.

Grief is the miraculous process that we have been given to move through that which is ceasing to be.  Grief creates the pathway through which we can release the old while making way for the new.  Grief, when engaged in fully, also helps to heal us from the loss so that we might be open to receiving the new life that is promised on the other side of the death.

The process of grief has been said to present itself to us in the following faces:

  • Shock
  • Denial
  • Bargaining
  • Depression
  • Anger
  • Sorrow
  • Acceptance

As it relates to the death our world is currently facing as brought forth through Covid-19, humanity is wavering somewhere between the stages of shock, denial, and bargaining.

Shock is the feeling we are all having as our lives have suddenly experienced a dramatic change.  Holy crap – this sh*t is real!  For many, (myself included), our lives have simply stopped.  With shock, all we can do is acknowledge the dramatic change while attempting to find our way into and through it.  As wave upon wave of new (and sometimes false) information comes our way, we may find our shock retriggered.  Again, acknowledge the trauma of the shock while trying to find a “new normal” for yourself.

Denial is when we don’t believe it’s real.  This is the state the U.S. was in for weeks/ maybe months as the virus was devastating other parts of the world, but hadn’t yet impacted us.  Many continue to be in denial over the potentially critical nature of the virus and the fear that many are experiencing as a result.

Bargaining is the stage that seems to be most apparent right now.  Bargaining is often characterized in a literal sense as in bargaining with God over the fate of a loved one.  Bargaining is also recognized in:

  • Desire for information: If we could only find enough information and the right information around this virus we will all be ok.
  • Attempts at control: Trying to find ways we can control the virus and the life we are living in the face of a pandemic. Some recent examples include:
  • Arguing over the perceived loss of civil liberties.
  • Protesting the stay at home orders.
  • Arguing for stricter stay at home orders.
  • Wearing masks/not wearing masks
  • Creating theories around what is true or not so that we can feel better (or in control)
  • Needing to be right.
  • Pointing the Finger of Blame: All the ways in which we criticize and condemn others for their response to the virus and our judgments around their response. This includes all the ways we shame others by telling them they are wrong.
  • If/Then scenarios: This somewhat falls into the control category. “If I wear my mask everywhere I won’t get it.”  “If I’m only with those who I know haven’t been exposed, then I’ll be fine.”  “If I think the right thoughts, take the right supplements, eat the right foods, then I will be fine.” 

 

All of these are natural human responses to grief.  There is no judgment of these reactions and none of them are wrong.  This is what we do when the world that we have known is suddenly yanked out from beneath us and we are left floating in the void of the unknown.  We are looking for something to hang on to, something that is concrete.  We grasp after the illusion of control when the world around us is completely outside of our realm of control.  We cannot delay the inevitable.  Neither can we stop it.

But there is one thing we can do to ease our fear and heal our pain:

LET GO

When we peel our grasping fingers off the throat of the dying world and allow ourselves to surrender to the unknown – this is where we find peace.  When we cease grasping after control, we will find that there is no risk of sinking into despair because instead, we will find ourselves being gently carried to whatever the new world might be for us.  When we let go we are able to grieve the loss of the old, find healing for our loss and be made ready for the new life that is silently calling to us from out of the depths of the void.

Where are you finding yourself in the grieving process?  What aspects of the dying world are your grieving?  What might you begin to let go of as you move through your own grieving process?

 

Posted in Authentic Freedom, Being Human, detachment, Faith, Freedom, Healing, Lessons

Authentic Freedom – Help for When the Bottom Falls Out

About a month ago, I received news that is a COMPLETE game changer. This news changes everything AND puts everything into question.  This news impacts literally EVERY aspect of my life and to say it has caused a mild state of shock would be an understatement.  It is during times like these that Authentic Freedom – the process I created which supports human transformation – comes most in handy and proves its effectiveness.

Each and every one of us has had these kinds of experiences – when the rug is pulled out from beneath us, when the ceiling caves in and when the universe, in one fell swoop, tosses us out of the nest of what we have known into what we cannot yet imagine.

The greatest temptation during these times of freefall is to make plans. Our mind, in search of something to hang on to, out of fear of the unknown, tries to make plans, or tries to become attached to potential and possible outcomes.  As many have learned, when we make plans (or try to make plans), God laughs.  I have witnessed the truth of this many times over in the past month as I have tried to plan my way out of and through this change.  A possibility shows up, a potential, a promise, and I get excited about it, imagining all the possible ways in which this will support myself and my family and then POW, the Universe throws a wrench in the deal and the whole things falls apart.  This is EXACTLY what happened this past Wednesday.  Two universes collided and everything that I had planned and waged my future on completely collapsed.

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Understanding the importance of grieving our losses, I have allowed myself time to grieve – to cry the ugliest cry, to tantrum, to rant and rave and wail. I reached out to my most trusted advisors for support and perspective and allowed myself to move through and to feel deep support.  In this, I found my way through the debris to the place where I can be open to what truly needs to manifest, knowing that in every death is the promise of new life.  I just don’t yet know what that new life might be.

I then created time and space away from all that might distract me from what I truly need to be doing at this time: SURRENDER. And in this surrendering, turning to what I know will guide me and support me in ALLOWING what it is that the Universe has in store for me – not a plan of my making, but one that comes directly from God and which is sure to be in my highest good, using my gifts in a way that is both fulfilling for me and in service to the betterment of the world.  And what I know will guide and support me is the very process that I created for others, Authentic Freedom.

In this process, I maintain diligent attention to my spiritual practice and apply the principles of Authentic Freedom for identifying and moving through the fears that might otherwise prevent me from seeing and knowing God’s plan when it shows up. I will then use the process of Authentic Freedom to move me through any fears or inner resistance to God’s plan so that I can step into the freedom that God has in store for me (and for all of us when we are paying attention).

The irony is not lost on me that all of this has occurred in proximity to the Fourth of July – the time we commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the journey that secured our liberty. As we celebrate the Fourth of July, let us be grateful for this external freedom while taking steps to secure the only freedom we will ever truly need – freedom from the inner fears, resistance and unhealed wounds that might otherwise stand in the way of a life of contentment and joy.

Authentic Freedom – Claiming a Life of Contentment and Joy available now on Amazon.  Buy it HERE.

AuthenticFreedomcover

 

 

Posted in Authentic Freedom, End of the World Prophecies, Mystics, Truth, world changes

Witness to the World’s Destruction

The world is on the path to its own destruction and there is nothing we can do but stand as witness, and hopefully when it is all said and done, be a source of support for those left standing.

destruction pixabay

Yesterday morning, we were graced with the beauty of a late-winter snowfall.  At 7:30 am, I went outside to shovel the sidewalk and steps up to my house in preparation for my morning Authentic Freedom Mastery course.  As soon as I stepped outside, I was hit with a powerful blast of pressurized energy that set my heart pounding and my head spinning.  The vertigo was so intense it was I could do not to pass out as I finished shoveling the walk.  After I completed my task, I clawed my way back into the house and laid on the floor hoping to stop the spinning.  Then the migraine hit – one of those axe-to the head migraines that insists, “You’d better cancel your whole day because you won’t be able to get off the couch.”  So I did.  Then I spent the day raging and writhing, venting and weeping, generally feeling sorry for myself, for everything and for nothing.  When I woke up this morning with the migraine hang-over and still feeling shaky and disoriented, I thought to myself, “not again.  I’m really getting tired of this shit!”  Then I prayed.  What I saw in my prayer shook me to the bone and the body-wracking sobs that poured out of me helped me to understand that it was not my own pain I have been feeling with these recurring migraines.  Instead, it is the pain of the world – specifically, the pain of a world on the path of its own self-destruction.

There it is.  The prophet’s apocalyptic call that most will choose not to hear, or will simply call me out as crazy for seeing and speaking the truth.  But you don’t need to be a rocket scientist to see where we are headed as a species if we don’t QUICKLY and DRAMATICALLY change our course.  Yes, I (we) know exactly what the world needs to do to change its course, but I’ve (we’ve) been singing THAT song for 15 years now and the world continues to turn a deaf ear.  Every single minute of every single day, people are choosing fear over love and as a collective, we are reaping the fruits of that choice – the fruits being the dead and rotting corpses of the mindless zombies we have become, attracted to noise and driven by an endless hunger for flesh.  As it turns out, the flesh we are consuming is our own, and it doesn’t appear that this is going to be changing anytime soon.  (Where is Rick when we need him?)

Cue the music video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9Dg-g7t2l4

So what are the prophets and a mystics to do when the world seems hell-bent on its own destruction?  There is really nothing more we can do but resolve ourselves to this fact, then stand by as witness as the world based in fear continues to choose fear, destroying itself in the process.  For those who will be lost in this fear, we grieve.  For what will be lost in this fear, we weep.  For the fear that is driving this destruction, we mourn.  And then we wait.  We wait in silent witness to the destruction and we wait in hope for those who will be awakened through this loss.  And when they awaken, we stand as teachers and guides, as sources of healing and support as together we work in building the new world that will seek to be born out of the ashes.

 

Posted in grief, Raised Catholic

The Cyclical Nature of Grief

Yesterday, and old grief was triggered in me, along with all the symptoms that have come along with this grief – deep sorrow, rage, hatred, anxiety, panic, trembling, emotional and intellectual paralysis, nausea, upset stomach, etc.  When I found I could not even give words to what I was feeling, I turned to my blog archives and found exactly the words I needed to hear – the words that clearly articulated my grief and the loss surrounding this grief.  In this I have been reminded of how grief continues to come back around seeking another layer of healing.  Thank you those who shall remain nameless for inviting me into another layer of healing and to the gift of God’s healing presence. 

The Church That Turned Away from Me

(originally posted on Good Friday, 2015)

Copyright 2015  Lauri Ann Lumby

StMarysinterior

For the past eight years, I have been fasting from the Eucharist.  To one on the outside looking in, I might be accused of turning away from my Church.  The opposite in fact is true.  It is the Church that turned away from me.

As a Vatican II Catholic, raised in a Vatican II Church, I have had a unique experience of Catholicism, markedly different from the generations that went before me.  I never experienced the Latin mass or was drilled on the Baltimore Catechism.  I attended Saturday evening folk mass accompanied by Kumbaya’s, Up, Up with People, and To Be Alive! Fish on Friday was reserved for Lent.  Ecumenical dialogue was encouraged and instead of Heaven being the privilege of Catholics only, the pearly gates stood open to all who lived in love. I was brought up with a rock n’ roll Jesus Christ Superstar who in his humanness pleaded to be released while weeping tears of blood at Gethsemane and to whom we desired to “see more clearly, love more dearly and follow more nearly,” as he danced around us in rainbow striped suspenders, sporting a Superman t-shirt.  Speaking out on matters of social injustice and working for peace; feeding the poor, clothing the naked and setting captives free was the understood responsibility of every person sitting in the pew.  Divine retribution and punishment had been left on the editing floor of the Holy See – along with indulgences; and even the unbaptized had a place in God’s loving kingdom. The only God I knew was the God of love. Jesus came to know this love and taught us how to love and was set up as the model and example of how every Christian was called to live.  We were called to be Jesus’ hands and heart through the unique charisms gifted to us by God’s Holy Spirit (sometimes even spoken of as a woman!).

jesus

This is the Church I grew up in and the Church that I deeply loved.  Strengthening this bond was the mass that provided sanctuary and support for my inherently contemplative nature. Gothic arches, painted statues and stained glass windows serenaded by artistic soul.  And the stand up, kneel down, bow and sit of Catholic choreography nourished my need for a spirituality that was as much physical as it was emotional and intellectual. Devotion to Mary satisfied my need for a Divine Mother and the saints became my superheroes.

If I love my Church so much, you may be wondering why I have been fasting from the Eucharist?  What went wrong?  In short, it seems I took what I learned about God, Jesus and our Christian call too literally:

  • I believe in an unconditionally loving God, a Son that is both fully human and fully divine; the call to follow Jesus as an example of how to live my life and to be and do as he would in the world.
  • I love God above all else, my neighbor as myself and I consider ALL of humankind to be my neighbor.
  • I judge not (lest I be judged).
  • I pray for my enemies.
  • I try to forgive 70 times 7 times.
  • I pray without ceasing.
  • I feed the hungry.
  • I clothe the naked.
  • I give sight to the blind.
  • I set captives free.
  • And, I heal the sick.

Oshkosh WI 2/9/11: Photo by Jeannette Merten.

In the end, it was the last three actions that caused my Church to turn away from me.

After eight years in Catholic school and an equal number of years in academic and professional education and formation as a lay minister and spiritual director, I was guided by God to study hands-on-healing and Eastern Energy Medicine (Reiki). Out of this training and experience, God guided me further to develop a protocol through which people found healing from the spiritual wounds that separated them from God’s love, thereby healing them of their sin.  Right in line with Jesus’ teachings, right!? Apparently not, because the practices that I had learned and successfully applied were not “explicitly handed down by the Magesterium.”  I was challenged and confronted, hateful emails and letters were sent. I was accused of every nature of evil. Local bishops, fueled by the fear of the vocal minority, challenged my work and eventually handed down a prohibition calling it “witchcraft and sorcery,” in spite of my attempts to reason with and explain things to them.  Through this, I endured, but when I was attacked by a newly-appointed  pastor for a course in “Christian Zen” that I was sponsoring, who claimed it to be “outside Catholic teaching” and who identified Eastern practices as “dangerous,” I broke.  My heart was broken and my resolve with it.  The Church I had loved and out of whose embrace I had come to know God’s love – the Church who had called me to continue the work of Jesus – had betrayed me.  My gifts, my call, the unique way I had come to know God was no longer welcome. More than that, my ministry had been condemned as “dangerous,” “witchcraft and sorcery”….some even called it, “the work of the devil.”

ChristianZen.jpgOn that fateful autumn day, I listened beyond the voice of the fearful priest, the self-appointed inquisition, and even the Vatican II teachings that provided space for the ecumenical nature of the work I was doing and the unifying discussions that might arise out of this work.  I listened instead to the still, small voice of God within.  God’s voice was not small that day.  God spoke directly and loudly to my heart, “Lauri, you are my beloved daughter.  I have placed my word within your heart.  I have anointed you to be my servant.  Who will you obey?  Man or Me?”

Of course I chose God.

With God and the echoing support of Peter and the Apostles who similarly responded to the Church who turned away from them, “We must obey God rather than man, (Act 5: 29)” I handed over my keys and walked away.  Buoyed by God’s eternal promise of freedom, I knew that I could more freely do the work God had called me to absent the on-going scrutiny of the Church and the fearful minority.

Some would suggest that in leaving the Church I have also left behind my faith.  The opposite, in fact is true.  My faith has remained intact, and in truth, has been fortified.  I start every morning in prayer and meditation over the daily scripture.  Jesus is my constant companion, teacher and guide. I discern daily the ways in which I am being called to continue Jesus’ work in the world. I have seen the clear evidence of God at work through me as I witness the profound healing experienced by those who have become part of my ministry, and I am continually amazed at how God works through me to bring people more and more deeply into love and more closely connected to their own gifts and vocational call in the world.  I see the power of faith at work as I witness the empowerment experienced by those who come to me for counsel, attend my classes, read my writing and partake in my weekly services; and with each passing day my faith is strengthened and affirmed.

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Regarding the Church, I wish I could say that like Lot, I never looked back.  I find, instead, that I am more like Lot’s wife, forever gazing back in profound longing – grieving the loss of my home, my sanctuary, my community, my Church.  Beyond my own grief, however, I weep for my Church.  I long for the Church that I had come to know – one that is firmly rooted in the truth of God’s unconditional love and acting as that love in the world.  I long for a Church that works for unity and empowerment of all humankind – regardless of their gender, beliefs, or sexual orientation.  I long for a Church that is willing to set down its wealth and its power and get in the trenches with those who need its help – the hungry, the poor, the imprisoned, the fearful, the wounded and the broken. I long for the Church that takes Jesus’ example seriously by being humble, giving the seats of honor to those without honor and washing the feet of strangers.  I yearn for a Church that supports people in becoming self-actualized, mature disciples – fostering the psycho-spiritual growth of men, women and children so that they can find the God they have forgotten in their hearts, discover their own unique giftedness and vocational call and become empowered in the fulfillment and use of these gifts in service to the betterment of the world.  I long for a Church that recognizes the earth as holy and sacred and works to be a steward for the gifts God gave us so that all of humanity may not only survive but thrive.  I cry out to the Church to work for justice – justice for all – not only for those who “are Catholic in good standing.”  My heart yearns for a Church that welcomes ALL people to its table – inviting all to know the unconditional and infinite love that is their truest nature. This is the Church that I once knew and I often wonder what happened to that Church – or if all along it had really just been a figment of my imagination.

 

 

Lauri Ann Lumby, MATP is a published author, ordained interfaith minister, spiritual director and teacher.  She ministers to a world-wide audience, most of whom were raised Catholic but who were also turned away by the Church.  Lauri lives in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.  You can learn more about Lauri and her ministry at www.authenticfreedomacademy.com.

Posted in Death, grief

A Little Lesson About Grief

As some of you know, I am currently traveling to Minneapolis to be with my family as we celebrate the life and love of my beloved Aunt, Patricia Evans Borg, who recently died from complications of COPD.  As I grieve the loss of my aunt and accompany my family (parents, cousins, siblings, my own children, other aunts and uncles) in mourning her death while celebrating her life, I have had an opportunity to learn a few lessons about grief. I share these lessons with you so that we all may have better tools for managing the losses of life.

Patricia Evans Borg November 25, 1939 - August 19, 2014
Patricia Evans Borg
November 25, 1939 – August 19, 2014

Lesson ONE – Grief Unacknowledged Comes Out Sideways

The news of Patricia’s imminent death came Sunday morning in an email.  She had been admitted into the hospital after going into respiratory arrest and being resuscitated.  She was on a ventilator and the prognosis was grim.  We were in the wait and watch period.  Soon, I found myself overwhelmed with anxiety, obsessive thoughts and compulsive planning.  I also found myself irritable, impatient, intolerant and even a bit angry.  I lost my temper with my son, snapped at my daughter and suddenly found myself obsessively worrying about money (unnecessarily so).  I looked at my calendar and realized the Universe had given me a few days off in the following week and decided I needed to make arrangements to go home to see Pat and be with my family.  I then felt peace.  Then my son asked me for something I wasn’t ready to give him and I lost my temper.  After losing my temper, I realized, “I’m sad about Pat.”  Then I apologized to my kids, shed some tears and acknowledged that I was grieving. Until I acknowledged my grief, it came out sideways in impatience, intolerance, frustration, anger, anxiety and all my typical expressions of anxiety.

Lesson Two – Grief Has Its Way with You

On Tuesday morning, I received the phone call that Pat had died.  SCREECH…..everything came to a stand still as my body and my spirit went into shock.  I couldn’t think straight.  I knew it was too early in the morning to contact family and find out more.  I sat down and tried to work and found I could not.  I thought about yoga and my heart said, “meh!”  I cried for a little bit.  Then I took a nap.  I felt numb and in a haze.  A couple hours later I had energy to get some necessary work done.  Then I needed another nap.  I called my kids to tell them the news and I cried.  I tried to eat and couldn’t.  I tried to force myself to at least accomplish the pieces related to the Virtual Church service for this week and couldn’t.  I decided, as “Pastor and Spiritual Director,” I had the freedom to excuse myself from this task on account of death.  Then I watched What Dreams May Come, and cried and laughed, and mourned not only my aunt’s death, but that of Robin Williams.  In all of this – paralysis, sadness, exhaustion, shock, foggy haze, lack of motivation, and sudden spurts of productive energy, I was reminded that in grief….WE ARE NOT IN CHARGE!  Instead, it is grief that is driving the bus.  Grief has its way with us…in its own way…in its own time.

Lesson Three – the importance of storytelling

After I lost my sh.t on my kids (as the grief was still coming out sideways), and after I acknowledged my grief and shed a few tears, my children spontaneously joined me at the dining room table and started telling their stories about Auntie Pat.  “Mom, remember that hilarious and awesome outfit she wore for Halloween that one year?”  “Mom, I love the time when Pat … I love the story Pat told us about…Mom, what was Auntie Pat like when you were young?”  The stories went on and on as we shared the many loving memories we had of our Auntie Pat.  I was acutely aware as we were sharing our stories, the healing power of narrative.  In remembering Pat, we were remembering her love, and finding healing through these shared and sometimes new memories.

Lesson Four – New Grief Brings Up Old Grief

As I have been grieving Pat’s death, I found past situations of loss reappearing.  In particular, I found myself overcome with anger and resentment over past relationship in which I had experience hurt and subsequent loss.  I found myself ranting and raving about “so-and-so” who had hurt, slighted, or insulted me in some way.  In the middle of day three of ranting, I suddenly realized, “Oh yeah….I’m grieving….here is the anger stage of grief….but instead of being angry at Pat, or about Pat, it is showing up in other unhealed losses.”  When I shared this observation with my daughter, she said, “Well, that would explain when I was sad about ….., that angry thoughts of … showed up.”  Who knew???  New grief brings up old grief.  My guess would be that the purpose of this is that new layers of healing can now be accomplished related to both (or all) experiences of loss.  HMMMMM

In Conclusion

Grief is the amazing and miraculous way in which we process the inevitable losses of the human condition and through which we find healing from these losses.  Grief is not something to be suppressed or ignored, but something to embrace, especially if we want healing from the pain of loss.  In a culture that tells us to “get over it…and move on,” it is ever more important to RE-LEARN the lessons about grief that were known by our ancestors and somehow forgotten in our quest to be “intelligent and rational” beings.  Grief belongs to all of us and the more we try to resist or suppress it, the more it will hound us.  So instead of resisting or suppressing grief, my invitation to all of us is to risk being vulnerable enough to grieve….and when we grieve, to grieve big so that we can find the new life that is promised on the other side of the loss.

 

Posted in grief, Midlife Journey

Revisiting Old Wounds

As we enter into the holiday season, it is important to be mindful that while this is a time of celebration, for many, holidays stir up old sorrow, old wounds and feelings of loneliness. This is also true of the midlife journey.  As our Soul tries to be awakened and birthed through us, it brings to the surface old wounds in search of another layer of healing.  Today’s blog presents a strategy for dealing with these old wounds when they come to call.

midlife crisis

Resurfacing

Last night, after a beautiful afternoon and evening of celebrating Thanksgiving with family and friends, I suddenly found myself feeling sad.  Then, as I slept, I found my dreams troubled by stories of frustration, heartache and sorrow.  Upon risinng, I realized the source of this sorrow and the troubling dreams.  A deep, and apparently as yet unhealed wound/loss had come to pay me a visit.  The resurfacing of this wound, I realized, was so that another layer of healing could take place.  My job, was to allow myself to acknowledge the wound and then to make time in which I could grieve another layer of this loss.

Midlife and Holidays

We have been speaking much about the midlife journey – the process through which our Soul seeks to be born and through which we have an opportunity to discovery the uniquely creative way in which we have been gifted to realize peace, love, joy and fulfillment in our lives and through which we are empowered to contribute to the betterment of the world. During the midlife transition, it is common for old wounds, hurts, losses, disappointments, betrayals, perceived failures to resurface.  The intention of this resurfacing is so that we can find another layer of healing and release from the pain that might otherwise hold us back from the birth of our greatest potential.  This resurfacing is especially acute during the holiday season and is not limited to those in midlife.  Again, this resurfacing is not there to harm us, but to give us another opportunity for deeper healing.  Our job is to allow the healing to take place.

Strategies for Dealing with Holiday and Midlife Pain

In a word:  GRIEVE.  When old pains, ancient losses, past betrayals resurface and we experience the memories and emotions related to these situations, we need to grieve.  And the healthiest and most effective ways we can move through this grief is to provide a space in our lives in which we can grieve, and then we must grieve.  These old wounds are here because they are ready for another layer of healing and the best way we can heal these losses is to be present to them and accept whatever face of grief shows up in the face of these losses:  sadness, depression, anger, maybe even denial and bargaining.  The greatest thing we can do for ourselves is recognize that we have been hurt, that we are grieving and then allow ourselves to stay in bed for a day, find a healthy way to channel or express our anger, or maybe even spending part of a day obsessing about the past hurt and working out plans for how is wouldda couldda shouldda been different.  Then, once we have engaged in all the external symptoms of grief, we need to make room for the real emotion of loss – sadness and we need to cry, or at the very least, allow ourselves to feel and be present to our sadness.  In this way, we are taking care of ourselves.  We are honoring our loss and we are allowing ourselves to heal.  And, if the pain becomes too great, seek outside help and support in the form of a good friend, loved one, counselor, spiritual director or Anam Cara (soul friend.).  The most important thing to know is that you do not need to bear this pain alone.  And if you are a person of prayer, always remember to turn to the God of your understanding for help and support in times of grief.

Lauri Lumby provides support for men and women moving through the midlife journey and moving through the pain of loss.  To set up a one-on-one session, call Lauri at (920) 230-1313 or email lauri@yourspiritualtruth.com.

Posted in Authentic Freedom, Spiritual Direction

Spiritual Direction Lauri Style Part II

Are You:

  • Feeling Restless, Impatient, Unfulfilled?
  • Grieving  a loss (death, diagnosis, divorce, job change, unemployment, empty-nest)?
  • Facing a life transition?
  • Longing for connection or healthy intimacy?
  • Suffering anxiety, depression, panic, worry?
  • Searching for answers?
  • Seeking balance?
  • Learning to name and claim your needs?
  • Recovering from abuse, addictions, loss?
  • Yearning for clarity?
  • Healing from childhood wounds?
  • Desiring to know the Source of peace?
Lauri and her brother, Patrick
Lauri and her brother, Patrick

Lauri Lumby is a professional Spiritual Director in the Ignatian tradition, Lay Minister and  Reiki Master Practitioner.Lauri has developed, Authentic Freedom, an approach to Spiritual Direction that goes beyond traditional counseling, therapy or recovery work, supporting you in identifying and transcending the deeper fears that are the source of your  compulsive behaviors and unhealed wounds.

Through compassionate listening and attentive presence, Lauri supports you in enjoying a fulfilling life of contentment, love and joy.

Lauri is available for appointments in person, over the phone and via Skype. You can reach Lauri at (920) 230-1313 or lauri@yourspiritualtruth.com