Posted in Spiritual Direction

Do Not Fear the Darkness of Life

It has been said that courage is not the absence of fear, but is instead the ability to move forward in spite of our fear. THIS is the lesson and meaning of life and what Jesus came to teach us.  This courage is what we commemorate and give honor to in our Good Friday observance and what we are invited to embrace in our own lives.  Whether we profess Jesus, Mohammed, Moses, the Buddha, Amma, Anandamayima, the 13 Grandmothers, Spider Woman, Mother Mary, Mary Magdalene or any other formerly living human as our teacher, the lesson is the same:

Do not fear the darkness of life. Instead, let it lead you to freedom.

In every spiritual tradition, the invitation is the same – FREEDOM. Some describe this freedom as salvation.  Others speak of it as presence, bliss, oneness, unity, peace, or love.  No matter what word is used to describe this freedom, the sentiment is the same.  We are here to remember the freedom we once knew and will once again know and we are here to remember this freedom right here in the midst of our human experience.

Like Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane. One of my favorite scenes from the life of Jesus.  Here he wrestled with his doubts and his fears.  Because of his foresight and wisdom, he had a sense of where his path was heading.  He knew there were those threatened by his presence and that if people truly believed what Jesus had come to know, many would lose their perceived place of power and privilege.  Jesus knew they plotted to kill him.  He was afraid.  Terrified.  And in this, he wondered if God really had his back.  Had he simply made it all up or was what had been revealed to him really true?  Jesus fought hard with these fears and doubts.  He was tempted to chuck it all and return to a normal human life.  Instead, through the agony of prayer, he found peace.  He discovered resolve.  He harnessed the deep well of courage within him to face his greatest fears – suffering and death.

But Jesus’ struggle didn’t end in the Garden. His fears surfaced over and over and over as he took one step at a time on the road to Calvary.  When accused.  While on trial.  When he was whipped and beaten.  When the soldiers placed the crown of throne on his head.  When we was given the cross to carry through the city of Jerusalem and up the winding road to Golgotha.  As people mocked and ridiculed him, spit on him, called his names.  When he fell.  When he stumbled.  Every step of the way rose up another fear.  Jesus did not overcome his fears, he walked through them. He faced them.  He bore them.  And he walked.  One step at a time.  As the executioners nailed his body to the cross.  As the cross was lifted and his body sunk under its own weight, crushing his lungs.  Terrified.  Feeling abandoned and betrayed.  Suffering the excruciating death of crucifixion.  Jesus was afraid.  In pain.  Suffering.  In his suffering he turned to God and this is where he found his courage.  Where he found his acceptance and peace.

Hopefully none of us will have to face the death of crucifixion, but fear, suffering, and death are all consequences of the human condition. We cannot escape it.  We will all experience suffering.  We will all face challenge and difficulty.  We will all experience loss, betrayal, and death.  This is the human condition and this is why the Jesus story is so important – for all of us.  In the crucifixion narrative and the events leading up to it, Jesus shows us how to face the darkness of life.  He shows us how to find our way through our fears (he never promises the elimination of fear) and most importantly, how to walk on in spite of our fears.

 

What darkness are you currently facing?

How are you being invited to be with your fears and in being with them finding the courage to walk on?

 

Authentic Freedom is a protocol inspired by Jesus which shows us how to face and move through our fears in our own journey toward freedom.  Learn more HERE.

Posted in Raised Catholic

There Was Good in the Old – an Ode to Notre Dame

Yesterday, in a discussion with the TWYH online community in which I am a member, we were sharing the deep sorrow we had all been feeling before hearing the news of Notre Dame burning. Before the event even took place, many of us were feeling a deep sorrow and the need to weep tears that were not specifically our own.  We were feeling the collective sorrow over the destruction of a centuries old icon while wondering, “what could this possibly mean?”  As I have ceased from trying to give meaning to world events, I could only ponder that question and yet in the sharing, one of the women said the following words related to her own sense of grief and these words hit me between the eyes:

 

There was good in the old.

 

Not only did these words hit me between the eyes, they hit me in the “feels.” Oh yes!  Oh yes!  There was good in the old and there continues to be good in the Church I once called my home and from which I have been in exile for the past eleven years.

In a similar conversation the day prior with a friend who is “spiritual but not religious” and scientific in her leanings, I tried, and failed, to express what it is like to be raised Catholic and the indelible imprint Catholicism leaves on one’s soul. From a rational perspective, I left the Church because I had to.  I left because the container of the Institutional Church had become too small.  I was no longer free to do the work I know in my Soul I have been called to do and I had to make a choice – be obedient to God or obedient to the Church.  I chose God.  While this choice has given me more freedom to pursue my Soul’s calling and has allowed me to minister to those the Church has turned away, the consequence of this choice is a loss that I will likely grieve for the rest of my days.

Why? A rational person would think this grief silly and unnecessary.  It is easy for those raised outside the Church to scratch their heads in disbelief over what seems to be a clinging to nostalgia or an unwillingness to let go of what has been.  Not so.  Not so.  There is something profound that happens in those of us that were raised Catholic and no matter how distant we become from the Church, there is always something that will remain.  I believe the words spoken by my online friend perfectly describes that which remains:

There was good in the old.

There is a mystery and a magic in Catholicism that is unmatched by other belief systems (at least in my experience). Where else is bread and wine turned into the “Body and Blood” of Christ?  Even if we only believe the magic of the Eucharist as symbolic, this is pure magic – transformational magic at that.  In the Eucharist – the central sacrament of the Catholic tradition, we are participating in the transformational act of becoming Christ.  When eating the bread and drinking the cup, we are saying “YES” to being the Body of Christ.  This is not meant to be lip service or an empty ritual of eating bread and drinking wine.  Eucharist is meant to be taken literally – we are accepting the invitation to follow in Jesus’ footsteps, to live as he lived, to do as he did – clothe the naked, heal the sick, give food to the hungry, free those imprisoned, pray for our enemies, love our neighbor, etc. etc. etc.  And in living as Jesus lived, we are meant to become him – to embody all he represented – purity, humility, generosity, mercy, compassion, love, all while living and working for justice.  For those who are paying attention, living in and among this ritual alone changes you.

There is wisdom in Catholicism. I discovered this wisdom in the rich tradition of contemplative prayer – a tradition previously reserved for those in religious orders – the Benedictines, Franciscans, Dominicans, Carmelites, Jesuits, etc. etc. etc.  Women and men who for thousands of years have dedicated their lives to the study of the scripture and praying with that scripture so they could know God and in the process, growing in love.  When I was in my ministry studies and learned these practices, they LITERALLY changed my life.  I began a daily practice and for 25 years (minus a couple when I was having babies), I did not miss a day.

In Catholicism every passage in life is treated (or has the potential for being treated) as sacred. Birth.  Entering adulthood. Marriage.  Vocational decisions.  Death.  Every passage in life is met with a sacrament.  Both life and death are treated as sacred and given their proper honor, along with the appropriate communal ritual for honoring that passage.  These are the rites of the ancients – a wisdom that has not been lost in the Church.

There is a Goddess in the Church. Mother Mary.  Mary Magdalene.  Eve.  Sarah.  Teresa of Avila.  Bernadette Soubirous.  Joan of Arc.  The one thing that Catholicism has that is lacking in all other expressions of the Christian faith – a Mother we can go to for comfort.  Women we can turn to for inspiration and support.  The idea of the Communion of Saints gives us not only women but also men who were Superheroes – people who dedicated their lives for the purpose of Love.  St. Francis of Assisi.  John of the Cross.  Meister Eckhart.  Ignatius of Loyola.  The list goes on.

There is beauty in the Church. The Cathedral of Notre Dame is the perfect example.  The first things rescued from the church were works of priceless art and religious relics.  Why is the whole world grieving the destruction of Notre Dame?  It is certainly not because they were raised Catholic – it is because they see the loss of beauty – the art and architecture of the middle ages which inspire awe and wonder by symbolically making visible the magic and mystery of life – that which some call “God.”

This is the old that is good. This is the good that remains.  Even if Notre Dame had burned to the ground (which reports assure us it has not), this good would still remain.  This is the good that has held the Catholic Church together all these years in spite of the reign of terror that has co-existed with all that is good.

There is good in the old. My hope has always been and will continue to be that as that which is no longer life-giving is burned away; it is the good that will remain.  Perhaps this is why Notre Dame allowed herself to be burned – to prove to the world that sometimes death is necessary to reveal the good that has always been there and to make a way for something new.

 

Posted in Authentic Freedom, Being Human, detachment, Forgiveness

The Journey from Vengeance to Compassion

I hear the whisperings of many:
“Terror on every side!
Denounce! let us denounce him!”
All those who were my friends
are on the watch for any misstep of mine.
“Perhaps he will be trapped; then we can prevail,
and take our vengeance on him.”
But the LORD is with me, like a mighty champion:
my persecutors will stumble, they will not triumph.
In their failure they will be put to utter shame,
to lasting, unforgettable confusion.
O LORD of hosts, you who test the just,
who probe mind and heart,
Let me witness the vengeance you take on them,
for to you I have entrusted my cause.
Sing to the LORD,
praise the LORD,
For he has rescued the life of the poor
from the power of the wicked!

Jeremiah 20: 10-13

 

I must humbly admit I sympathize with Jeremiah in his rant against his enemies and his desire to see vengeance meted upon them. In the many years I have had to deal with those who “hate me” I have gone from praying for their suffering and basking in satisfaction as I watch karma enacting its justice upon them to where I am today – still finding some satisfaction in karma (I’m still human!) but mostly having compassion for the suffering they continue to choose while I (mostly) live in peace. Not a peace born out of satisfaction for karmic retribution, but my own peace in knowing the Love that I am in God and doing my best to live from that Love.

The peace that I now know is the fruit of 25 years of diligent attention to my spiritual practice. This is a practice that goes beyond sitting in silence and includes unwavering accountability to everything within me that might otherwise infringe upon my ability to know Love. This unwavering accountability has nothing to do with freeing myself from “sin” out of a fear of Divine retribution. Instead, it is an acknowledgment that I have wounds from my past, social conditioning and fears that have kept me from knowing God’s love – not because God’s love is being withheld, but because these wounds, etc. prevented me from feeling and knowing the Love that has been here all along.

In knowing this Love, I feel whole and complete within myself. When I waver from this feeling of wholeness, I tend to the wound that is still asking for healing. Now, this is where I’m going to lean a bit in Jeremiah’s direction in describing in contrast the inner life of my “enemies.” For the record, I no longer consider these people my enemies, but I know that to them, I am the enemy. I am the enemy because I dare to question, challenge, and confront the doctrine they cling to – a doctrine they cling to mostly out of fear of God’s punishment.

These are those I have come to refer to as “the self-appointed inquisition” who for years harassed me, tried to sabotage my work, spread rumors against me, called the contemplative practices I teach “the work of the devil,” called my healing work “sorcery and witchcraft” and wrote letters of complaint to the local bishop so much that I understand the file on me is enormous and that I have been officially blackballed in the local diocese. To them, my work is “dangerous.” And, I guess it is. I invite people to use the brain God gave them to reason, discern and exercise their truth and to challenge anything cloaked in fear.

In the past, I was heartbroken by the action of these people – many of whom I thought were my friends. I was traumatized when a group of them came to one of my classes and turned it into an inquisition. I was further traumatized by the local chancellor who harassed me about a class I was teaching on the Aramaic Lord’s prayer. I was profoundly insulted and disappointed when the same chancellor promised to let me speak on behalf of Reiki – arrived 45 minutes late to our meeting and then issued the Reiki prohibition (which he always intended to issue) the very next day. I found myself writhing in anger, hatred and confusion of how these so-called Christians were treating me. I felt like a victim to their constant harassment.

Then the harassment stopped. Not because the self-appointed inquisition ceased their relentless inquiry and reporting on everything Lauri Lumby – but because I no longer care. Not caring is not a defense mechanism born out of fatigue. Instead, “not caring” is the detachment born out of Love. The more I have come to know the Love that I am, the less I am triggered by other people’s fear. The more I know God’s Love, the less I care about what other people think of me or my work. And in this I have peace – a peace my “enemies” will likely never know.

This is where my dreams of vengeance turn to compassion. Today when I see or hear from my “enemies” I no longer see their cruelty, I see their fear. I see a fear born out of shame – shame for who God made them (it’s not ok to be gay in the Catholic Church), shame for past actions for which they have never forgiven themselves, shame out of secrets that might destroy ones place in society, shame out of something so deeply suppressed that the only thing that can come through is prideful self-righteous. As it relates to the officials of the Church who have made me their enemy, I see fear, shame and in some an arrogant quest for power – using fear, deceit and manipulation to acquire that so-called power. For all of these I now bear compassion knowing that they will never know the peace I know in coming to know the Love that I am as God’s beloved daughter – the same love available to all of us if only we have the courage to heal the fears that keep us from knowing this Love.

Support yourself in healing the fears that keep you from knowing the Love that you are.  Discounted pricing through April 30, 2019.  Click on the image below to learn more and to register. 

 

 

 

Posted in priestess training, self-actualization, Spiritual Development, Spiritual Formation

A New/Original Vision of Priesthood

For the past 2000-5000 years, priesthood (across religions) has meant one thing: a position of power and authority held by men acting as an intermediary between the undeserving flock and their god. These men have been given themselves the power to interpret the word of their god and to dictate doctrine around their interpretation of that word.  They have appointed themselves determiners of who is saved and who is not and have created rituals and practices to be practiced by the undeserving so that they might earn the “love” of a jealous and fickle god and therefore their heavenly reward after death.  These men have used the threat of eternal damnation to manipulate those they “serve” and have benefitted from a culture based in fear. These men have been held as separate, more important and more powerful than the people they “serve” and have benefitted from this separation, given places of honor and becoming rich on the backs of those who are expected to pay, pray and obey.

Whereas not every man who has followed the call to be “priest” (or woman who has taken on this kind of priesthood) has lived their priesthood in this way, all are complicit in a culture and a structure that places one in a position of power over those they are meant to serve. The current structure of the priesthood – especially as it is expressed in the Catholic Church in which I was raised, is a culture of (often white) privilege rooted in separation lived out through power and control.  I can’t help but believe that this is not what Jesus had in mind.  In fact, it seemed that Jesus spoke openly against those who placed themselves in positions of authority and who lauded their power over others.  Instead, Jesus provided a completely different model of what priesthood might be which seems to have gotten lost somewhere along the way.

In order to understand the kind of priesthood that Jesus lived and then modeled for those who spent time in his company, we don’t have to look very far. Scripture is quite clear about the priesthood that Jesus embodied – one of healing, comforting, teaching and empowering with Jesus hanging out, not at the top of the pyramid, but at the bottom of an inverted triangle upholding and uplifting those he sought to serve.  In this, Jesus created a container in which those to whom he ministered might be supported in doing what Jesus did – coming to know themselves as One with God in love, and in this oneness coming to know their own unique giftedness and then supported and empowered in the development of and then sharing of these gifts – for the sake of their own fulfillment and in service to the betterment of the world.

This is the priesthood that Jesus embodied and the priesthood that Mary Magdalene was empowered to embrace. When we turn to those scriptures that didn’t make the cut of the emerging hierarchical/patriarchal institution that became Christianity, we clearly see Mary in this role:  comforting, healing, teaching and empowering the other disciples to go forth and continue the work that Jesus empowered them to do.  In this, Mary was living not as a priest within an institutional church, but as High Priest in the spirit of the ancient tradition of mystery schools which served to support women and men in achieving the fullness of their personal, psychological, emotional and spiritual development.  In short, Mary, like Jesus, did the work to support what modern-day psychologists call self-actualization.

What would our world look like if we lived priesthood in this way – coming to know our own self-actualization and then empowering others to do the same?

 

Full content reserved for Plus, Premium and Premium-Plus Members. Click here to learn more on how you can become a member and enjoy the tools that have helped me in my own journey.  Find an example of what is available in the full content HERE.

Posted in church, Jesus, Mary Magdalene, order of the magdalene

Mary Magdalene – Healing the Patriarchal Wound of Christianity

Two-thousand years ago, a Jewish man fell in love with the mystical teachings of his faith – teachings about love, compassion, and oneness. In his love of his faith, he discovered an intimate relationship with the Divine who he called “Abwoon” – meaning all that is.  He felt the love of this Divine being as the love of a parent for their child – and even more so. In this love, the man found peace, contentment and joy along with the means by which he could experience “heaven on earth.” In his excitement of this discovery, this Jewish man did what every rabbi did before him; he sought to teach others what he had learned.

He taught where all rabbis taught – in the synagogue, in the courtyard of the Temple, in the fields, on the hillsides and near the shores of the living waters. He was invited to dinner in people’s homes and he taught there. He taught wherever there were those “with ears to hear.” In his wanderings, he attracted a company of women and men who chose to follow him so that they might learn even more from this man who knew and showed great love.

In this company of women and men, there was a very special woman, Mary, from the house of Lazarus. She along with her brother Lazarus and sister Martha, became Jesus’ devoted students, learning all he could share with them, while gaining insights and revelations of their own.  Mary took to Jesus’ teachings in a unique and special way.  Soon, Mary and Jesus became one. Mary understood the depth of what Jesus had come to know in a way unique from the others and in this, she too became teacher.

Lewis Williams, SFO

When Jesus was arrested, put on trial and murdered, Mary was there by his side. With the other women and a few brave men, they stood watch and offered prayers of support for Jesus as he suffered and died.  They never left his side.  When Jesus’ body was removed from the cross, Mary and the other women anointed his body for burial, wrapped it in linen cloths and offered the requisite prayers of burial.  When the stone was rolled in front of the entrance to the burial cave, the women wailed.  They cried.  The tore their hair and clawed at the ground.  In tending to their own grief and to the horrors of Jesus’ dying, they created space in which new life could begin.

And it did. Three days later, Jesus rose from the dead and appeared to Mary.  She saw and she believed. And then Jesus did a remarkable thing – he appointed Mary, now called Magdalene, “Tower of the flock.” Mary was ordained and sent forth to continue Jesus’ mission in his stead.  He did not give over his mission to the men who remained hiding in the Upper Room. He gave it to the woman who had the willingness to be emptied of all within her that might hinder her from knowing anything other than LOVE. He gave it to the woman who was free enough of ego to stand face to face with her greatest fear – the torture, suffering and death of her beloved and to have the courage to trust that even in this greatest loss, new life would emerge.

Mary was the new life.  Mary, now called Magdalene, went forth to share with the other disciples the good news and to continue what Jesus began – supporting the disciples and anyone else with ears to hear – in the mission of Love.

But then, patriarchy stepped in. Unwilling to let go of their fear of the patriarchal cultural norm and unwilling to set aside their egos enough to remember the equality that Jesus taught, the disciples rejected Mary’s message.  “This is the ravings of a woman.  Jesus’ could not have risen from the dead.  What does that even mean?”  Then Mary showed them.  She showed them how they could see Jesus and experience his presence, his guidance and his teachings.  They saw a glimpse, but they did not experience the fullness of what Mary described and then they became jealous.  They asked Mary why Jesus would appear to her and not to them.  How could he love her more than they?  Mary tried to explain, and Jesus through her.  But still the disciples could not accept that Jesus would choose her over them. So they cast her out.

Mary then went on her own way, with Lazarus and Martha beside her, the other women, along with a couple of the men who believed, and did what Jesus ordained her to do. She continued in the mission of Love.

The other disciples tell it differently. It is to Peter that Jesus gave the mission of building the new church (a church Jesus never spoke of building), and the purpose of this church was salvation.  Only those who believed as the disciples told it would be welcome into paradise at the end of time – totally forgetting that the only kingdom Jesus spoke of what the one right here in our midst when we are free enough of our fears to know Love. Sadly the Love Jesus taught was forgotten and replaced instead by fear.

This fear is the patriarchal wound of Christianity.  Fear born out of jealousy.  When the disciples cast out the woman Jesus ordained to continue in his stead, they cast out all women.  No longer reflecting the balance between masculine and feminine that Jesus favored, the Church became the distortion of love.  Instead of being rooted in the Oneness that Jesus preached, the new Church was based in separation and fear, power, control and privilege. Like the patriarchal culture in which they were raised, the men created a hierarchical, patriarchal institution where those in power are lauded as better than the rest and where salvation was the privilege of the few who would obey their commands. What we have today is a sad and broken institution whose fear comes out sideways in gluttony, lust for power, wrath, envy, greed, sloth, and the worst of these – pride.  Here children are raped and the offender excused, women are denied their rightful place as teachers and guides, our humanness (including our sexuality) is demonized, and instead of people living in LOVE, they are cowering in fear.

Embracing Mary Magdalene changes all that! In place of fear we find love.  Instead of hierarchy we discover collaboration.  Instead of power over, we have power with.  Not because of Mary, now called Magdalene, but because of what she represents – the core of Jesus’ message which is LOVE.  But this message of Love is not even about Jesus – it is about the truth of our Source, our original nature, ourselves, all of creation, and that which some might call God.  Love is who we are.  Love is all there is.  When we remember as Jesus and Mary Magdalene remembered, then there will be peace and we will fulfill our mission as humans which is to discover heaven on earth.  So mote it be!  Amen!

Scholarly resources:  https://templeofthemagdalene.com/2018/01/16/my-mary-magdalene-reading-list/

 

Posted in Mary Magdalene, order of the magdalene, priestess training

The Order of the Magdalene Welcomes its 100th Candidate for Priesthood

The Order of the Magdalene has accepted its one-hundredth candidate for priesthood.  The Magdalene Priesthood Training, inspired by Jesus’ closest disciple, Mary Magdalene, is a twelve-month training program restoring women and men to their rightful place within Jesus’ vision for humanity. The priesthood training supports participants in becoming self-actualized and empowers them in fully living out their Divine and Human natures as love.

The Order of the Magdalene Priesthood Training continues the work begun by Jesus and fulfilled by Mary Magdalene by empowering candidates to live out the fullness of their unique giftedness – both for the sake of their own fulfillment and in service to the betterment of the world.

The Order of the Magdalene, founded by Minneapolis native, Lauri Ann Lumby, OM, OPM, MATS, is named for Mary Magdalene who became fully empowered under the guidance, direction and support of Jesus of Nazareth. Mary was Jesus’ closest disciple; the only one identified to have completed the full course of Jesus’ public and secret teachings; and initiated as co-equal partner.  It was to Mary whom Jesus first revealed his resurrected self, and it was Mary he commissioned to share the good news with the other disciples and who Jesus ordained to continue his work in his stead.

The Order of the Magdalene supports its members in their work of carrying out Mary Magdalene’s mission of Love – turning the world from fear into love through the use and sharing of their own unique gifts.

The Magdalene Priesthood is not hierarchical, patriarchal nor clerical in nature. The Magdalene Priesthood is grounded in the egalitarian model favored by Jesus – one in which every individual is honored as uniquely holy and sacred. The Magdalene priesthood seeks only to serve the common good of the all through the mission of love.

You can learn more about the Order of the Magdalene and the Priesthood Training HERE.

Posted in End of the World Prophecies, world changes

5.39 billion standing at the ready and quietly bringing forth the new world.

In this post I share what came through in our monthly Authentic Freedom (dot) Love ZOOM gathering.  As the fearful and vocal minority hasten the destruction of the world based in fear, power and control, the 5.39 billion majority are standing at the ready quietly bringing forth the new world.

 

We spoke last night of all the violence and hatred in our world, along with the inverted distribution of power.  The 1% of the 1% seemingly making all the decisions and getting rich off these decisions while the rest of the world suffers. It is like a pyramid with a shiny gold tip – where the power brokers live and plan while the rest of us (the other 99% of the pyramid) work to make them rich. The collective outcry in all of this is “I didn’t vote for this” – meaning NO ONE wants to see the destruction of education, increasing limits on access to healthcare, and most of all – NO ONE wants to go to war.

Sadly, the latter is where we seem to be headed. Not because any of us want it – but because that shiny gold tip of the pyramid gets rich off of war – war is a HUGE money maker – for those who hold the gold and therefore are making the rules.

BUT – as we discussed last night, this is only the part we are being shown. The loud distractions and outcries of a dying system clinging to what (they think) is left of their power. Creating conflict where there is none. Directing the media focus toward “bad news” while filling our bodies with numbing foods and our sight with what “they” want us to believe is the American Ideal. For those of us who are awake, there is no one we are interested in “Keeping up with” but ourselves. And yet, as was once said about Kramer’s portrait on Seinfeld, “It is loathsome and hideous, and yet I cannot look away.”

This is what they want us to see. This is what the sleeping masses are choosing to see. And yet, this vocal minority is just this – the vocal minority. While the dying system clings to what is left of their power (the ability to make people afraid through the media), 99% (well, at least 70%) of us (the bottom of the pyramid) are awake, aware, and quietly doing our work to build the new world that will come forth out of the ash of the old world once it finally dies! AMEN!

Our children are doing their part as well. As I met with the “magical children” yesterday afternoon, I was reminded that they SEE the world. They SEE through the bullshit and they are quietly observing everything that is wrong with the current world and how they will choose otherwise when it is finally their turn.

I can tell you THEY CANNOT WAIT for it to be their turn. They already know what their world will look like – access to quality education (including college) for all, an end to prejudice and injustice, universal healthcare, and no more war.

 

Where the old world sees and seeks out conflict, our youth are seeking understanding.

 

They (the ones I know anyway) were born in a state of unity consciousness – seeing no separation between race, religion, sexual orientation, etc. They see all people as one and do not understand why the rest of the world cannot figure this out. Sounds familiar, right!?

Children change the world

 

We know our mission. We know why we are here. We are here to bear witness to the dying world and to hold the space in which the new world can be planted, take root and grow. The miracle in all of this is that much of our “work” is already done, and so much more is being done. Yet to the dying world – WE ARE INVISIBLE! As we learned last night, THIS IS ON PURPOSE. Our work is being veiled. We are being protected. We and our efforts are only being seen by those who are able to see. To the rest of the world, it’s almost like we do not exist – or at the very least we are looked upon as insane, and therefore irrelevant. But we are not irrelevant and we are here. In fact – WE ARE THE MAJORITY. As the 1% work on destroying themselves, we are quietly, peacefully, subversively planting the seeds for a new world. When we look at our world through this lens, our efforts are evident and in many cases, bearing fruit. If I’m being conservative, that is 70% of 7.7 billion –

 

5.39 billion standing at the ready and quietly bringing forth the new world.

 

Not insane.

Not irrelevant.

And critically important for the survival of the human race.

 

Thank you my sisters and brothers for doing your part in bringing forth the new world – most commonly just by your very presence. It’s most often not what we do that is causing the change – it is simply who we are. Thank you!

 

Love,

Lauri

 

 

Posted in God

What Do We Know of God?

I am giving all credit and honor for this week’s (dot)Love newsletter to my long-time spiritual director, Leanore Rommelfanger. In my session with her this week, she literally blew my mind – and my ego – with her wisdom.   Leanore, this is for you!

What do we know of God – really? The short answer to this question is NOTHING.  To quote Schultz from the 1960’s sitcom Hogan’s Heroes, “We know NOTHING!”  We really, truly know nothing of God.  We don’t even know if God exists.  And yet, for as long as human beings have walked this planet, we have pondered the infinite mysteries of the universe, including life itself.  As we gaze in wonder at the universe, at the miracles of creation, of the beauty all around us, we know that we did not do this, nor could we.  But if human beings didn’t create all of this – then who, or what did?  As we struggle to make sense of the difficulties, challenges and suffering that all seem to be part of life on this planet – we also wonder, who or what is causing this?  Are we causing this suffering by our actions or are they caused by something outside of our control?  Or, as the chaos theorists surmise, is this all completely and totally random?  Is creation simply brought about by a bunch of random particles bouncing off of each other creating life as we know it?

At the end of the day, we will never truly know – at least as long as we are on this side of the veil. Yet this does not stop human beings from trying to make sense of it all. The ancients determined that the world was created by The Great Mother (Creatrix) who birthed the universe through her very self. Ancient tribal cultures give credit to the Great Spirit in the Sky.  Some acknowledge one Divine Being who can express itself in a multitude of ways and forms and does so through what these cultures call their “gods.”  Some conceive of an Earthly and Earthy Source.  Others think of the gods as from above.  Some believe aliens created our world – but if so, where did they come from?  The Hebrews believed in One God who was infinite, who bore many names and who was truly genderless and could express itself as female or male, but who for many became LordJesus called his god Abwoon, which western religion has translated as Father.  Scripture tells us that Jesus found himself to be One with God and it was in this Oneness that he discovered the kingdom of God, what today we might call peace or contentment.  The author of the letter of John, in his (or her) deeper reflection on Jesus’ teachings described God as Love.

Ultimately we define god by our own tribal custom, beliefs and through our own understanding. Most commonly, we are making god in our own image or defining god by our experience of human beings.   I know this idea might be shocking to some – but think about it.  In the Christian tradition alone, there are a million ways in which God is defined – all based on a human being’s interpretation of scripture which can only be interpreted through that individual’s life experiences and the lens through which they have experienced the world.  Some versions of Christianity speak of a fire and brimstone god, one who is judging humanity and waiting to throw sinners into the fiery pits of hell.  Others preach an unconditionally loving god.  Everyone else preaches something in between the two.  Which god is really and truly God?  In the limited experience of being human, we will never truly know.  St. Paul once said in quoting Isaiah(64:4):

However, as it is written:

“What no eye has seen,
what no ear has heard,
and what no human mind has conceived”
the things God has prepared for those who love him…

 these are the things God has revealed to us by his Spirit. 1 Cor 2: 9-10

From the perspective of our tiny human experience, we cannot fathom the nature of God. Even Paul put conditions on God – “for those who love him.”  Only those who love will be privy to the wonder of God – and God is only male.  Sigh.

But, such is the nature of our human condition. Our view and our understanding is limited.  But we still keep trying to define God.  What would happen if we stopped defining God and instead, allowed God to reveal God’s Self to us?

BRAIN EXPLOSION!

GREY MATTER ON MY KEYBOARD.

A big Homer Simpson “D’OH!”

 

What would happen if we got out of our big fat egos and instead of trying to define or explain God, we let God do that for us? I suspect this may have been what Paul was getting at in the continuation of the passage from 1 Corinthians 2:

Full content reserved for Plus, Premium and Premium-Plus Members. Click here to learn more on how you can become a member and enjoy the tools that have helped me in my own journey.  Find an example of what is available in the full content HERE.

Posted in Mary Magdalene, order of the magdalene, priestess training

Order of the Magdalene Priest and Priestess Training

I am excited to announce that this week I welcomed the first man and the 36th woman in the FULL 12-month online Priest and Priestess training of the Order of the Magdalene!  They join the 30 in Oshkosh who have completed this training and the nearly 30 other women and men who have completed the online Resurrecting the Magdalene course which includes the Magdalene Activation and Ordination!  This is great news as we continue to unfold new/old ways of being what we used to call “church” and reclaim the self-actualization that is meant for us and which was modeled and then taught by both Jesus and his beloved and successor, Mary, the Magdalene.  This is a true testament to the return of the Divine Feminine and the Divine Masculine and the continued healing and restoration of our world. As a humanity (though the “powers that be don’t want us to see it this way) we are truly becoming ONE. Learn more

Learn more about the Magdalene Priest and Priestess Training HERE.