Posted in church, Inspiration

A Temple Not Built by Human Hands

For thousands of years, human beings have been building temples to their gods. From the humble beginnings of forest shrines, to the temples of the East, to the gargantuan medieval cathedrals and in more modern time, the mega-church complexes, human beings have designed and built external structures to house, to reflect, and to give worship to their gods.  In many belief systems the believers were required to offer sacrifice and worship within the walls of these temples so as to earn the favor of their god.  For some, neglect of these obligations is met with threats of eternal damnation.

These temples were built to represent an external god. God was either thought to be in the temple – either contained within its walls, within its tabernacle; or at the very least, it was only in the temple where god could be met.  The walls of the temple were meant to keep gods in and non-believers out.  Some belief systems have even created rules where those who don’t believe, or those within the faith who aren’t considered worthy because they have not completed the prescribed atonement rituals or sacrifice are not truly welcome.  Keeping gods in and the undeserving out.  All of this rooted in the belief that as human beings, we are separate from God.

Jesus taught otherwise. Raised Jewish, Jesus learned and followed the prescriptions of his faith.  He listened to the stories of his ancestors.  He studied the words of the prophets.  He memorized and followed the law.  He was a good Jewish boy doing what good Jewish boys do.  But, as the stories seem to imply, Jesus heard and experienced something beyond the surface layers of his Jewish faith.  He did not simply attend synagogue on Saturday to fulfill his Sabbath obligation.  It is likely that somewhere in his journey with his Jewish faith, he came upon the more mystical studies of his tradition.  Here he discovered a God that was not only in the temple.  He found a God that was not in a heaven light years away.  Likely through contemplation, meditation and prayer, and through the guidance of others who had come this way before him, he found a God who was not “out there” but dwelt deep within Jesus’ own being in a state he called “Oneness.”  Jesus discovered that the kingdom of God was not out there, but was within him in this state of Union where he experienced peace, contentment and bliss. John the Evangelist later called this experience Love.

For Jesus, the temple became something not outside of himself. Rather, he came to understand that he was the temple – that we are all the temple.  God is in us and we are the temple of that Divine Spirit.  The mystical traditions of Judaism (the Kabbalah) affirm this.  We know and understand this when we do the work Jesus did of healing ourselves of all that which seems to separate us from God – fears, false perceptions, ego attachments, old wounds, etc.  This is the work Jesus (likely) learned through his own Jewish faith, which he accomplished for himself and when he then went on to (try to) teach his disciples.  Some got it.  Some did not…..

 

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Learn the Kabbalistic principles practiced by Jesus through the Order of Melchizedek Training:

 

 

Author:

I am a trained, professional Spiritual Director, Author and Hands-on Healer. I offer services, programs and classes that empower you to hear the voice of the Divine that speaks from within you. It is the voice of the Divine that leads us to our highest truth, to the discovery and cultivation of our gifts and to a life of Authentic Freedom where we know contentment, compassion and joy. Your truth will set you free!